Essential Reading

Insights from Quadrant
Insights from Quadrant

Clappered-out
credibility

It was June  17, 2017, and the cream of Canberra journalism was clotted at the National Press Club to have preconceptions and prejudices about the Trump administration burnished by James Clapper (above), who was in town to pick up some quick pocket change for a FIFO gig at ANU. With the Russiagate hoax in full swing, the hacks  were keen to absorb the alleged insights of the man who served as Barack Obama’s national security adviser and, as he put it, spoke with the authority of an operative with “fifty-plus years in the intel business”.

Things were crook in Washington, Clapper told his audience, what with this Trump creature upsetting apple carts and doing the Russians’ bidding. That was when Mark Kenny of what was then the Fairfax press wondered what would become of America and Australian-US relations with such a rogue in the White House. Clapper replied:

…Watergate pales really, in my view, compared to what we’re confronting now.

I will add at least this American isn’t walking away, put it that way. I will just speak for myself.

Two years on, the Mueller probe having found nothing and with US federal investigators now looking into the origins and perpetrators of the Russiagate hoax which inspired it, Clapper is still speaking for himself, albeit in a somewhat shaken and lost-for-words manner.

Appearing on CNN mere minutes after the news broke that probers are poised to drag him and others into a criminal investigation, with the distinct possibility of grand jury appearances, perjury risks and charges being laid, the confident Clapper seen in Canberra was not in evidence.

For more on the net closing about Clapper and other Deep Staters, the links below are instructive.

Bombshells from the Flynn investigation

Durham investigation goes ‘criminal’ and the media shudders

Insights from Quadrant

Googling bias

Douglas Murray, keen to highlight the leftoid prejudice that shapes Google’s search results, urges the curious to search for “gay couples” in Google Images.

This is what the results present.

As a second experiment, he also recommends searching on “straight couples”.

This is what turns up.

In the clip below he explains what’s afoot. Even those vehemently opposed to regulating the media will find it hard to disagree that the search-engine outfit could use some vigorous persuasion to adopt a straight-bat approach to serving its users’ needs.

Insights from Quadrant

Ayers Rock,
almost gone

Marc Hendrickx, who has led a passionate crusade to keep Ayers Rock/Uluru open to climbers, tried to have the ad reproduced above inserted in the pages of the Age and SMH, which both rejected it.  While things must be looking up at the former Fairfax rags, which can apparently afford to knock back ad dollars, Marc remains ropeable. He writes:

This is all wrong! The park board and the petty bureaucrats of Parks Australia have stolen my dreams for my children with their empty words and lies. How dare they! And yet I am one of the lucky ones. I was able to climb. My children, and their children and their children’s children will not be able to climb and share the joy and wonder of views listed as World Heritage by the United Nations.

How dare you!

For more than 30,000 years people have been climbing Ayers Rock. The first humans to see the Rock climbed it. Past Anangu owners like Paddy Uluru and Tiger Tjalkalyirri climbed it, and they were happy to share the climb with visitors. Since 1958 over seven million people, men, women, children, families and lovers have climbed it. They came from all over the world — and now you tell me that Anangu never climb? I am sick of your lies. How dare you

The lease agreement protects cultural heritage in the Park. It protects the climb. The World Heritage agreement protects the views. What is the point of protecting views if nobody can see them. How dare you!

You pretend the climb is especially sacred, even though Paddy Uluru and his brother said it wasn’t. Why do you make stuff up? How dare you!

You say the climb is dangerous when we know it is safer than a visit to the Grand Canyon or diving on the Great Barrier Reef. For people under 50 in good health the risk is the same as flying there. How dare you!

You say that less than 20 per cent of visitors want to climb when we can see with our own eyes what a nonsense that is.

How dare you say climbers are damaging the Rock when it has been there for 70 million years, and it will be there for 70 million more.

How dare you say climbers crap on the Rock. There is only one toilet around the Rock, where do you think the base walkers go? Do they carry excrement in their pockets?

How dare you blame visitors for management’s deficiencies.

How dare you deny the science in favour of animist nonsense. You eagerly trap generations in a cultural prison. How will they escape if they reject science because you won’t tell them about it?

Young people are starting to understand your betrayal. The eyes of future generations will be upon you. And if you fail us, we will never forgive you. This is where we draw the line. Change is coming whether you like it or not.

Almost alone, Quadrant has covered the history, culture and myths surrounding the Rock and the climb. That coverage can be accessed via these links.

Insights from Quadrant

Timing is everything

Last night, 4Corners turned in one of those investigations that make you think the ABC — a tiny part of it at any rate — might actually be worth a small slice of the billion-plus dollars the all-media behemoth consumes every year. The topic was the Lawyer X scandal which saw Victoria Police make an informant of gangland lawyer Nicola Gobbo and has since prompted an ongoing royal commission. Viewers who expected VicPol’s past and present brass to emerge in a less than favourable light were not disappointed. Amongst the sharpest critics was the state’s former chief prosecutor Gavin Silbert QC, whose mildest observation was that

documents have been dribbled forth to the Commission, always late and not with adequate time for those effected to cross examine on them. There’s obviously been a concerted attempt [by VicPol] to stymie the Commission as much as been possible.

and this

The upper hierarchy of Victoria police has to take complete responsibility. I mean the buck stops at the top clearly, and it went as high as the Chief Commissioner and some Assistant Commissioners.

Those who knew and sanctioned what was happening were guilty of terrible breaches of duty and extraordinarily unethical behaviour.

and this too, about Chief Commissioner Graham Ashton

… I don’t know how he’s lasted so long. Public perceptions of the police force have been very damaged by this, and as the High Court has said, it goes to the fundamental foundations of the whole of the criminal justice system. How that’s repaired, I don’t know.

But one would have thought anyone in the hierarchy who sanctioned this should have gone.

The 4Corners crew must be just a little miffed that their magisterial overview of such a foul, reeking, unethical mess did not prompt maximum morning-after follow-ups. What they could not have known was that VicPol just happened to have something up its sleeve that would redirect headline writers’ attention.

After years of carjackings, home invasions, riots and stores being blitzed by mobs of hit-and-run thieves and complaints that the constabulary has not been doing enough to arrest teenage gangs, many “of African appearance”, VicPol went raiding all over town in the hours after 4Corners aired, an operation that has so far seen the arrests of 57 alleged miscreants.

Suddenly, a former chief prosecutor’s wonderment that the Chief Commissioner at the centre of the scandal remains on the beat was pushed way, way down the news organisations’ lists of top stories.

Sheer coincidence, no doubt.

— roger franklin

Essential Reading

Insights from Quadrant
Insights from Quadrant

Clappered-out
credibility

It was June  17, 2017, and the cream of Canberra journalism was clotted at the National Press Club to have preconceptions and prejudices about the Trump administration burnished by James Clapper (above), who was in town to pick up some quick pocket change for a FIFO gig at ANU. With the Russiagate hoax in full swing, the hacks  were keen to absorb the alleged insights of the man who served as Barack Obama’s national security adviser and, as he put it, spoke with the authority of an operative with “fifty-plus years in the intel business”.

Things were crook in Washington, Clapper told his audience, what with this Trump creature upsetting apple carts and doing the Russians’ bidding. That was when Mark Kenny of what was then the Fairfax press wondered what would become of America and Australian-US relations with such a rogue in the White House. Clapper replied:

…Watergate pales really, in my view, compared to what we’re confronting now.

I will add at least this American isn’t walking away, put it that way. I will just speak for myself.

Two years on, the Mueller probe having found nothing and with US federal investigators now looking into the origins and perpetrators of the Russiagate hoax which inspired it, Clapper is still speaking for himself, albeit in a somewhat shaken and lost-for-words manner.

Appearing on CNN mere minutes after the news broke that probers are poised to drag him and others into a criminal investigation, with the distinct possibility of grand jury appearances, perjury risks and charges being laid, the confident Clapper seen in Canberra was not in evidence.

For more on the net closing about Clapper and other Deep Staters, the links below are instructive.

Bombshells from the Flynn investigation

Durham investigation goes ‘criminal’ and the media shudders

Insights from Quadrant

Googling bias

Douglas Murray, keen to highlight the leftoid prejudice that shapes Google’s search results, urges the curious to search for “gay couples” in Google Images.

This is what the results present.

As a second experiment, he also recommends searching on “straight couples”.

This is what turns up.

In the clip below he explains what’s afoot. Even those vehemently opposed to regulating the media will find it hard to disagree that the search-engine outfit could use some vigorous persuasion to adopt a straight-bat approach to serving its users’ needs.

Insights from Quadrant

Ayers Rock,
almost gone

Marc Hendrickx, who has led a passionate crusade to keep Ayers Rock/Uluru open to climbers, tried to have the ad reproduced above inserted in the pages of the Age and SMH, which both rejected it.  While things must be looking up at the former Fairfax rags, which can apparently afford to knock back ad dollars, Marc remains ropeable. He writes:

This is all wrong! The park board and the petty bureaucrats of Parks Australia have stolen my dreams for my children with their empty words and lies. How dare they! And yet I am one of the lucky ones. I was able to climb. My children, and their children and their children’s children will not be able to climb and share the joy and wonder of views listed as World Heritage by the United Nations.

How dare you!

For more than 30,000 years people have been climbing Ayers Rock. The first humans to see the Rock climbed it. Past Anangu owners like Paddy Uluru and Tiger Tjalkalyirri climbed it, and they were happy to share the climb with visitors. Since 1958 over seven million people, men, women, children, families and lovers have climbed it. They came from all over the world — and now you tell me that Anangu never climb? I am sick of your lies. How dare you

The lease agreement protects cultural heritage in the Park. It protects the climb. The World Heritage agreement protects the views. What is the point of protecting views if nobody can see them. How dare you!

You pretend the climb is especially sacred, even though Paddy Uluru and his brother said it wasn’t. Why do you make stuff up? How dare you!

You say the climb is dangerous when we know it is safer than a visit to the Grand Canyon or diving on the Great Barrier Reef. For people under 50 in good health the risk is the same as flying there. How dare you!

You say that less than 20 per cent of visitors want to climb when we can see with our own eyes what a nonsense that is.

How dare you say climbers are damaging the Rock when it has been there for 70 million years, and it will be there for 70 million more.

How dare you say climbers crap on the Rock. There is only one toilet around the Rock, where do you think the base walkers go? Do they carry excrement in their pockets?

How dare you blame visitors for management’s deficiencies.

How dare you deny the science in favour of animist nonsense. You eagerly trap generations in a cultural prison. How will they escape if they reject science because you won’t tell them about it?

Young people are starting to understand your betrayal. The eyes of future generations will be upon you. And if you fail us, we will never forgive you. This is where we draw the line. Change is coming whether you like it or not.

Almost alone, Quadrant has covered the history, culture and myths surrounding the Rock and the climb. That coverage can be accessed via these links.

Insights from Quadrant

Timing is everything

Last night, 4Corners turned in one of those investigations that make you think the ABC — a tiny part of it at any rate — might actually be worth a small slice of the billion-plus dollars the all-media behemoth consumes every year. The topic was the Lawyer X scandal which saw Victoria Police make an informant of gangland lawyer Nicola Gobbo and has since prompted an ongoing royal commission. Viewers who expected VicPol’s past and present brass to emerge in a less than favourable light were not disappointed. Amongst the sharpest critics was the state’s former chief prosecutor Gavin Silbert QC, whose mildest observation was that

documents have been dribbled forth to the Commission, always late and not with adequate time for those effected to cross examine on them. There’s obviously been a concerted attempt [by VicPol] to stymie the Commission as much as been possible.

and this

The upper hierarchy of Victoria police has to take complete responsibility. I mean the buck stops at the top clearly, and it went as high as the Chief Commissioner and some Assistant Commissioners.

Those who knew and sanctioned what was happening were guilty of terrible breaches of duty and extraordinarily unethical behaviour.

and this too, about Chief Commissioner Graham Ashton

… I don’t know how he’s lasted so long. Public perceptions of the police force have been very damaged by this, and as the High Court has said, it goes to the fundamental foundations of the whole of the criminal justice system. How that’s repaired, I don’t know.

But one would have thought anyone in the hierarchy who sanctioned this should have gone.

The 4Corners crew must be just a little miffed that their magisterial overview of such a foul, reeking, unethical mess did not prompt maximum morning-after follow-ups. What they could not have known was that VicPol just happened to have something up its sleeve that would redirect headline writers’ attention.

After years of carjackings, home invasions, riots and stores being blitzed by mobs of hit-and-run thieves and complaints that the constabulary has not been doing enough to arrest teenage gangs, many “of African appearance”, VicPol went raiding all over town in the hours after 4Corners aired, an operation that has so far seen the arrests of 57 alleged miscreants.

Suddenly, a former chief prosecutor’s wonderment that the Chief Commissioner at the centre of the scandal remains on the beat was pushed way, way down the news organisations’ lists of top stories.

Sheer coincidence, no doubt.

— roger franklin